Monday, May 13, 2019

Fwd: Women Making History: Ten Objects, Many Stories



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: HarvardX <harvardx-news@harvard.edu>
Date: Monday, May 13, 2019
Subject: Women Making History: Ten Objects, Many Stories
To: Scott Lord <scottlordnovelist@gmail.com>


Learn how American women created, confronted, and embraced change in the 20th century while exploring ten objects from Radcliffe's Schlesinger Library.
 ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌
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Women carrying signs in a protest march

Women Making History: Ten Objects, Many Stories

Learn how American women created, confronted, and embraced change in the 20th century while exploring ten objects from Radcliffe's Schlesinger Library.

Learn more

What you'll learn

  • The many ways ordinary people have created change
  • The centrality of women in American history
  • How history is complex, nonlinear, and in constant conversation with the present
  • How objects can embody stories of change
  • How our understanding of history is shaped by which stories are told

About this course

As we approach the centennial of the passage of women's suffrage in 1920, there has been a recent burst of activism among American women. Women are running for political office in record numbers. Women are organizing and taking to the streets to demand change. Women are grappling with inclusion and intersectionality.

While some of this activity may have been a response to the 2016 presidential elections, its roots lie deep in 20th-century history — a history richly preserved in Harvard's Schlesinger Library building on the library's 75th Anniversary Exhibit.

Enroll now

This course exemplifies the importance of archives in the making of history. Professors Laurel Ulrich and Jane Kamensky, along with colleagues from across Harvard University and beyond, show how women in the 20th-century United States pushed boundaries, fought for new rights, and challenged contemporary notions of what women could and should do.

Through the exploration of ten iconic objects from the Schlesinger collection, they demonstrate how women created change by embracing education, adopting new technologies, and creating innovative works of art; pushing against discrimination and stepping into new roles in public and in private.

Enroll now

Related subjects

Humanities

 

U.S. History

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Scott Lord <http://scottlord.blogspot.com>

Scott Lord <http://garboseastrom.blogspot.com>



Friday, April 19, 2019

Fwd: From the Ashes of Notre-Dame



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Age of Cathedrals Course Team <no-reply@t.mail.coursera.org>
Date: Friday, April 19, 2019
Subject: From the Ashes of Notre-Dame
To: Scott Lord <scottlordnovelist@gmail.com>


Dear Learners,

     Notre-Dame de Paris will be rebuilt.  Monday's event was a shock felt around the world, but we must remember that fires were a regular part of the life of cathedrals in the Middle Ages and ever since.  The use of candles, the abundance of textiles on walls and altars, the timbered structure known as "the forest" sustaining the roof were all fire hazards of the first order.  Flames rained down on Notre-Dame de Chartres cathedral when the Vikings attacked the city in the early tenth century.  Bishop Fulbert, who came to Chartres in the 980s, rebuilt Chartres, which burned again in 1134.  We have a written account in the "Miracles of Our Lady of Chartres" by the thirteenth-century Jehan le Marchand of a devastating fire in 1194, no less vivid than the images seen around the globe on today's TV.  "Neither vault nor other building were left standing," he writes, "Beams and posts collapsed.  In the heat of the fire the lead [of roofs] all melted, walls and ramparts went crashing, belfries and glass went flying.  All was turned to perdition, either by fire or collapse."  Miraculously, the most sacred relic of Chartres, the holy tunic which Mary wore when she gave birth to Jesus and which is still visible in the cathedral crypt, survived the fire which took three days to bring under control.  After this second fire in the space of sixty years, Pope Celestine III instructed his emissary, a certain Melior, who happened to be in Chartres at the time, to supervise reconstruction "of a church such as could not be found anywhere else in the world."  Melior urged the townspeople of Chartres to "open their purses and empty their pockets...to pay workers and masons who know how to do such work."

     When in 1836 the medieval roof of Chartres again burned, the Minister of Historical Monuments consulted Eugène-Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc, who not only worked on the rebuilding of Chartres, but on just about every major Gothic cathedral in France.  Viollet is know especially for the reconstruction of Notre-Dame de Paris, which he supervised from the early 1850s to 1863 when he installed the spectacular wooden spire whose flaming plunge we witnessed today.  

     Notre-Dame survived the hammers of enthusiastic revolutionaries who in 1789 defaced whatever religious sculpture they could reach, and who, mistaking statues of the kings and prophets of the Old Testament for the kings of France, toppled them to the ground.  Between the end of the eighteenth century and Viollet's restoration, Parisians lived with a "toothless Notre-Dame."  The Cathedral of Paris survived the sacking and burning of the sacristy in the Revolution of 1830, the bombardments of the Franco-German War of 1870, and the urban destruction of the Commune.  It escaped unscathed two world wars in the last century. 

     As the chief sanctuary of the French nation, Notre-Dame is the heart and soul of France.  Napoleon was crowned Emperor there in 1804.  It was to Notre-Dame that General De Gaulle marched with the liberation army down the Champs-Elysées in 1944.  The French gathered there to mourn the Air France disaster of flight 447 in 2009, and again to express national grief for the slain priest Jacques Hamel in 2016.  

     Reconstruction of Notre-Dame de Paris calls now for a Viollet-le-Duc of our time to mobilize the masons, carpenters, glass and metal workers, sculptors, painters, and other artisanal trades still alive in France to connect the modern-day cathedral to its medieval and post-medieval past.  The life of a building is like that of a living organism that suffers, is restored, is renovated, and is maintained as the life blood of a nation.

Best,

Howard

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Scott Lord <http://garboseastrom.blogspot.com>



Sunday, March 24, 2019

Fwd: Welcome to week 2



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Seeking Women's Rights: Colonial Period to the Civil War <courses@edx.org>
Date: Sunday, March 24, 2019
Subject: Welcome to week 2
To: scottlordnovelist@gmail.com


Welcome to week 2 of Seeking Women's Rights: Colonial Period to the Civil War!
Go to edX Home Page Sign In

We hope you're enjoying Seeking Women's Rights: Colonial Period to the Civil War! We want to let you know what you can look forward to in week 2:

  • An examination of the factors that led to the rise of the women's history as an academic field, including the women's liberation movement of the 1960s and 70s
  • A look at the relationship between race, class, and gender and its impact on the kinds of work that different women do
  • Discussions with prominent women's historians about their motivations for studying women's history
  • Conversations with Dr. Thai Jones in Columbia University's Rare Book & Manuscript Library

With self-paced courses, you learn on your own schedule. We encourage you to spend time with the course each week. Your focused attention will pay off in the end!

Resume your course now

Don't miss the opportunity to highlight your new knowledge and skills by earning a verified certificate. Upgrade by March 31, 2019.

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Scott Lord <http://scottlord.blogspot.com>

Scott Lord <http://garboseastrom.blogspot.com>



Monday, March 18, 2019

Fwd: Welcome to week 1



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Seeking Women's Rights: Colonial Period to the Civil War <courses@edx.org>
Date: Sunday, March 17, 2019
Subject: Welcome to week 1
To: scottlordnovelist@gmail.com


Welcome to week 1 of Seeking Women's Rights: Colonial Period to the Civil War!
Go to edX Home Page Sign In

We hope you're enjoying Seeking Women's Rights: Colonial Period to the Civil War! We want to let you know what you can look forward to in week 1:

  • An examination of the ways that women struggled to loosen the constraints of family by proclaiming that they, like men, possessed individual rights.
  • A review of the emergence of women's history as an academic field and its impact on the study of history as a whole

With self-paced courses, you learn on your own schedule. We encourage you to spend time with the course each week. Your focused attention will pay off in the end!

Resume your course now

Don't miss the opportunity to highlight your new knowledge and skills by earning a verified certificate. Upgrade by March 31, 2019.

Upgrade Now

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Scott Lord <http://scottlord.blogspot.com>

Scott Lord <http://garboseastrom.blogspot.com>



Fwd: You're in! Buddhism Through Its Scriptures - Share with a friend!



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: edX <info@edx.org>
Date: Monday, March 18, 2019
Subject: You're in! Buddhism Through Its Scriptures - Share with a friend!
To: scottlordnovelist@gmail.com


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Scott Lord <http://scottlord.blogspot.com>

Scott Lord <http://garboseastrom.blogspot.com>