Monday, May 14, 2018

The course is open!



Sent from the desk of Scott Lord

Begin forwarded message:

From: "Buddhism and Modern Psychology  Course Team" <no-reply@t.mail.coursera.org>
Date: May 14, 2018 at 5:02:27 PM EDT
To: "Scott Lord" <scottlordnovelist@gmail.com>
Subject: The course is open!

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Letter from EDX MOOC instructor, Harvard University



Sent from the desk of Scott Lord

Begin forwarded message:

From: "Greenblatt, Stephen" <greenbl@fas.harvard.edu>
Date: May 10, 2018 at 3:44:03 PM EDT
To: Scott Lord <scottlordnovelist@gmail.com>
Subject: Re: Tyranny in Shakespeare

Thanks for your kind note. I hope your wife's health improves.  

With best wishes,

Stephen Greenblatt

On 5/10/18, 2:16 PM, "Scott Lord" <scottlordnovelist@gmail.com> wrote:

   Dear Sir,
        I am very sorry we missed your book signing in Harvard Square last night, but my wife has been ill. We were in fact in the square having ice cream the night before last, but it was on the way back from seeing a physician, and I left your lecture as tentative.
   Let me drive in the point that your MOOC is exceptional and I appreciate your being on EDX. You have been a great help with Hamlet and The Taming of the Shrew.
        I live in East Cambridge, so if I bump into you later allow me to quickly introduce myself as your online student with a thank you.
         Scott Lord
         Apologetically.

   Sent from the desk of Scott Lord

Letter from EDX MOOC instructor, Brown University



Begin forwarded message:

From: "Egan, James" <james_egan@brown.edu>
Date: March 6, 2018 at 11:14:02 AM EST
To: Scott Lord <scottlordnovelist@gmail.com>
Subject: Re: Fantastic Places

Dear Scott Lord,

Thanks so much for e-mail.  I'm pleased that you enjoyed the course.  I came up with the idea for the course some time ago while I was doing research on 16th and 17th century broadsides, pamphlets, and other writings in English about "special providences."  Eventually, the focus moved from the 16th/17th centuries to more modern works, and, out of that, came the course!  

Thanks again for the e-mail.  Best wishes in your future online courses!

Best, Jim 

On Tue, Mar 6, 2018 at 1:16 AM, Scott Lord <scottlordnovelist@gmail.com> wrote:
     Thanks for the course. Did you use the concept of other cultures influencing authors when you came up with the various imaginary worlds, ie. Robotica?
     It was also cool that The Shape of Water came out of nowhere as a film that could be applied to the concept of Unhuman, perhaps one of your students was involved with the postproduction.
And finally, I have already passed the section on Anne Bradstreet (presumably from my hometown?) In an earlier MOOC, but if you like Chinese subjects in American poetry, Amy Lowell has some nice entires.

I Lookforward to your next online class.
Scott Lord,
Online student.

Sent from the desk of Scott Lord



--
Jim Egan
Professor, Department of English
Interim Director, John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities & Cultural Heritage
Brown University
401-863-6115

Thursday, April 12, 2018

You completed Introduction to Who Wrote Shakespeare!



Sent from the desk of Scott Lord

Begin forwarded message:

From: "Coursera" <no-reply@t.mail.coursera.org>
Date: April 12, 2018 at 11:18:37 PM EDT
To: "Scott Lord" <scottlordnovelist@gmail.com>
Subject: You completed Introduction to Who Wrote Shakespeare!

Fwd: Congratulations, Your Course Certificate is Ready!



Sent from the desk of Scott Lord

Begin forwarded message:

From: "Coursera" <no-reply@t.mail.coursera.org>
Date: April 12, 2018 at 11:18:36 PM EDT
To: "Scott Lord" <scottlordnovelist@gmail.com>
Subject: Congratulations, Your Course Certificate is Ready!

Dear Scott Lord,

Congratulations! You did it. You've successfully completed Introduction to Who Wrote Shakespeare.

University of London, Goldsmiths, University of London and Coursera have issued you an official Course Certificate.

Share Your Success

Visit your Accomplishments Page to take advantage of great ways to promote what you have achieved:

  1. View and download your Course Certificate
  2. Share your detailed Accomplishments page with your course grade
  3. Add your Course Certificate directly to your LinkedIn Profile

Once again, congratulations on a job well done. Look out for more Course Certificate courses starting soon.

Keep learning,
The Coursera Team

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Copyright (c) 2018 Coursera, Inc | 381 E. Evelyn Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94041 USA

Congratulations



Sent from the desk of Scott Lord

Begin forwarded message:

From: "Introduction to Who Wrote Shakespeare Course Team" <no-reply@t.mail.coursera.org>
Date: April 12, 2018 at 11:18:37 PM EDT
To: "Scott Lord" <scottlordnovelist@gmail.com>
Subject: Congratulations

Dear Scott Lord,

Congratulations on completing Introduction to who wrote Shakespeare.

We hope you have enjoyed this MOOC and the opportunity to begin to explore the topic of the Shakespeare authorship.

We would be very grateful for your feedback by taking this short survey.

Best wishes,

Dr Ros Barber

Go to course
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Sunday, March 25, 2018

Final Message from the Fantastic Places: Unhuman Humans BrownX Team



Sent from the desk of Scott Lord

Begin forwarded message:

From: "Fantastic Places, Unhuman Humans: Exploring Humanity Through Literature" Course Staff <ENGL102x-no-reply@courseupdates.edx.org>
Date: February 27, 2018 at 2:05:10 PM EST
To: scottlordnovelist@gmail.com
Subject: Final Message from the Fantastic Places: Unhuman Humans BrownX Team

edX Course Update for Fantastic Places, Unhuman Humans: Exploring Humanity Through Literature
edX Logo

Course Update from:
Fantastic Places, Unhuman Humans: Exploring Humanity Through Literature

Go to Course

Dear Fantastic Places: Unhuman Humans learner,

We hope that you had an exciting journey with Professor Egan (and Leila), exploring what it means to be human by examining the grotesque, monstrous, and alien creatures found lurking in the magic of fiction! We also hope you learned a bit about the research, creativity, and interdisciplinary critical inquiry taking place at Brown University.

You now have "read-only" access to the course, which allows you to browse the content (discussions and some other activities are no longer live). The course will be available in this mode until it is offered again. We encourage you to return to the course and continue learning from the material.

If you have not yet done so, please visit the Course Wrap-Up section and complete the Course Exit Survey today; it should take about 5 minutes to complete. Your feedback is very important to us as we continue to develop new BrownX courses.

We welcome you to stay connected with us via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook for BrownX course updates and other news from Brown University.

Thank you once again for joining Professor Egan and Leila on their travels to discover what distinguishes humans from unhumans, brought to virtual life by literature.

Sincerely,

The BrownX Team




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Course end: a final update



Sent from the desk of Scott Lord

Begin forwarded message:

From: Warhol Course Team <noreply@coursera.org>
Date: May 27, 2014 at 4:13:37 AM EDT
To: Scott Lord <scottlordnovelist@gmail.com>
Subject: Course end: a final update

Scott Lord,
The latest information from Warhol by The University of Edinburgh on Coursera.
And so we come to the end of the Warhol course - or, at least, of the scheduled content delivery. Our discussion forums are still thriving, and they will remain open and live for a while, so please do feel free to visit them and contribute. Having said that, we have a few last announcements in order to wrap up the course.

Final pieces of assessment information
The Week 5 Peer Assessment Submission Phase has now closed. The Evaluation Phase has started, and will remain open for a week, until 9am (UK time) on Tuesday 3 June. The quiz closes a day earlier: it remains open until 9am (UK time) on Monday 2 June.

Please remember that 10% of the course mark is allocated to forum postings: you need to make a minimum of ten. This includes both postings and comments, and it includes comments and posts made anonymously.

Extra sites
Our two Tumblr sites are still receiving submissions. This one is for Week 2 Peer Assessment work - please keep checking this one out, as we continue to receive more work. And this one is for Week 5 Peer Assessment essays; now that the submission deadline has passed, we're expecting it to become populated with a considerable amount of content.

In addition, one of the people on the course has started up a MOOC magazine which is going to publish some of the essays from the course. Check out their website here. Thanks to Edie Sedgwick for setting this up!

And finally
It's an appropriate time for us to thank the team who helped to make this course a reality. A huge thanks to all of our interviewees: Anthony d'Offay, Kirsten Dunne, Keith Hartley, Fiontan Moran, Gary Needham, Kerry Watson, and Matt Wrbican. A number of people behind the scenes provided support and helped to make this course happen: Taz Chappell, Nicole Dezelon, Deborah Howes, Marie-Louise Laband, Cindy Lisica, Damien McGlynn, and Alyson Rolington. We really want to thank some of our University of Edinburgh colleagues who helped in putting the course together: Sian Bayne, Louise Connelly, Nicol Craig, Jen Ross, Imogen Scott, Harry Weeks, and Amy Woodgate. Extra special thanks to two particular people: Christopher Ganley, who provided extraordinary assistance in setting up major chunks of our course content; and Lucy Kendra, who worked magic making and shaping our videos.

But obviously, we also want to thank you. Much of the success of a MOOC relies on the discussion and interaction that takes place in the forums. We've had an amazing time chatting to many of you in the forums and on Twitter, and we hope you've had a productive and educational time too. In particular, we wanted to say thanks to the following, who really helped to shape the tone and content of many interesting discussions: Kirsty Baring, Bryndie Beach, Paul Beaudoin, Victoria Evans, Derek Grainge, Andrew Greaves, Chav Hammer, Ian Hazzard, Denis Jones, Scott Lord, Edie Sedgwick, and Sj. But that list is too brief, a mere sampling. Our heartfelt thanks to you all for helping to make this course a great experience.

Glyn, Ian and Vicky
The Warhol course team
Visit the course to start learning
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Copyright (c) 2014 Coursera, Inc | 381 E. Evelyn Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94041 USA

Saturday, March 24, 2018

Fwd: Al Filreis



Sent from the desk of Scott Lord

Begin forwarded message:

From: Commentaries <noreply+feedproxy@google.com>
Date: March 24, 2018 at 8:47:31 PM EDT
To: scottlordnovelist@gmail.com
Subject: Al Filreis
Reply-To: Commentaries <afilreis@writing.upenn.edu>

Commentaries

Al Filreis


Preface to a book on/as Duchamp's infrathins

Posted: 24 Mar 2018 07:42 AM PDT

The seminar is a convergence of the two entities: right there where Marcel Duchamp's infrathin space-between-spaces and the students' own experiments with language meet. Where "The dictatorship of grammar" (#100) is only there to be overthrown. Where "The vibrations from sound, audible yet invisible" (#243) are nonetheless seen. Where the space "Between saying and meaning" (#385) is also known as the classroom. Where one is by design never forced to choose "Between passion and purpose" (#993). As Goldsmith has enjoyed saying to anyone within earshot, the poetry world is more than a half-century behind the visual art world; experiments in painting, sculpture and conceptual art have been doing things that most poets and poetics people have heretofore felt impossible or unnecessary. The term "behind" suggests a competition, but of course it's not that. It's not a course (as it were) with a finish line or single endpoint. It's a means, a movement defying conventional academic evaluation, a way toward fresh conception through educational defamiliarization. The success of the project comes from putting the two worlds aesthetically — and pedagogically — together. Thus will emerge, we expect, a new generation of artists and arts-minded citizens who are actively uninterested in distinctions between the arts; they know it's all one project.

Every other year Kenneth Goldsmith teaches a year-long seminar on writing about/through contemporary art. The 2017-18 seminar was held as a collaboration of the Center for Programs in Contemporary Writing at Penn and the Philadelphia Museum of Art (in particular the Modern division) — and the students created their own version of Duchamp's infrathins. In a few weeks a book containing the students' Duchampian compositions will be published, and it will include the following prefatory statement by me.

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